• 0 New for sale Ker designed catamaran MC50

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    The MC50 is the first of a range of catamarans developed for McConaghy Boats. It is developed to create optimum balance of lifestyle, performance and comfort. She is built largely from carbon fibre. When Jason Ker designed the McConaghy MC50 CAT, his primary focus was to deliver a light, high performance multihull with more space and accommodation … that goes very, very fast! The globally impressive MC50 was a collaboration between Ker, a team of experienced owners and sailors and McConaghy’s 50 years of building yachts. The luxurious MC range also has Bureau Veritas classification for blue water sailing – the highest global rating. The key design features: The large interior saloon space can become outdoor space, due to huge sliding side windows and bifold aft doors. The sailing cockpit is entirely on the flybridge so does not obstruct the space and views of from the saloon. The flybridge is a space visually and socially connected to the interior, but with its own 360 degree views. Considerable weight has been saved through advanced engineering and use of carbon fibre composites, so the yacht can spend much more time sailing instead of motoring. Take a 360 degree tour around the MC50   Exterior - Speed, Safety and Comfort Advanced composite materials are used throughout. You’ll be on top of the world in the built-in helm station on the flybridge – and enjoy a commanding 360-degree view of your cruising area. Great visibility means manoeuvring and marina berthing are a breeze. Descend the stairway from the flybridge to a spacious cockpit with plenty of seating and sun lounging space for rest and relaxation. Select the optional hydraulic swim platform and create your own private terrace with easy access to the water for swimming and water sports. Spacious uncluttered non-slip decks provide safe, easy access to the foredeck area and composite carbon longeron – an impressive statement of this multihull’s prowess. Interior - Your apartment on the water Access the spacious saloon via electric lifting doors and enter a stylish haven which is designed with relaxation and entertainment in mind. Light modern timbers and soft fabric finishings ooze style and sophistication. The galley provides ample space for even the most discerning chef. All accommodation options are bright, light airy spaces with fine lines and designer touches, ensuring you get a great night’s sleep wherever you are moored up. And the MC50 CAT, whilst being comprehensively equipped as standard, has numerous choices for optional extras so you can customise your own boat so that it is perfectly suited to your specific needs and budget.   SPECIFICATIONS        

  • 0 Photo-album Maxi Longobarda

    • News
    • by Team Racing-Yachts.com
    • 23-02-2020
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    We have visited the Maxi 82 by Farr Yacht Design in Portugal. Longobarda was a breakthrough IOR maxi that set a new standard in the class during 1989 until the early 1990s. She was the product of a successful combination of Bruce Farr design talent, SAI Ambrosini (Italy) build quality and a no-expense-spared budget, courtesy of her owner, Italian yachtsman Gianni Varasi (who had previously owned Raul Gardini's earlier yacht, Il Moro di Venezia II). Now refitted into a fast performance cruiser The reportage you can find via this link: https://tinyurl.com/vax7nlz  

  • 0 New video's Bolt 37 online

    • News
    • by Team Racing-Yachts.com
    • 21-02-2020
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    Check our Youtube channel for two new video's of the Bolt 37. She is in ready to race condition.

  • 0 MAT 1070 2nd IRC Nippon Cup Hayama

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    MAT1070 2nd in IRC class divsion A @ Audi Nippon Cup Hayama 2019    

  • 0 The new MC38 Australian Champion - Steve Barlow's Lightspeed

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    The new MC38 Australian Champion - Steve Barlow's Lightspeed, Maserati 2nd, Ginger 3rd, Hooligan 4th   Middle Harbour Yacht Club, Mosman NSW, Australia: The MC38s are back at it and the new season began with fireworks, Lightspeed struck hard by Lazy Dog in a port/starboard incident in fresh conditions on Saturday February 1 and unable to finish the day, but ultimately returning to claim top regatta honours. It was the one time the class opted not to use on-water umpires; a decision Australian president Shaun Lane says is a test case that won't be repeated. With owner Steve Barlow out with a shoulder injury, Lightspeed was helmed by James Mayo, best known as crew on the champion Etchells called Magpie, the current Australian titleholders and runners-up at the class' world championship in 2019. Mayo's had his eye on the MC38 class for a while and jumped at the chance to drive. "We trained on Friday in 26 knots which was a good learning curve. Over the course of the series I had to make sure I really focused on what the others, who know the boats best, were saying, and not let my instincts take over." According to the protest outcome, Shaun Lane and Quentin Stewart's Lazy Dog, nicknamed 'naughty dog' after the Middle Harbour Yacht Club-run first act, failed to keep clear in a port/starboard and broke rules 10 and 14. They completed their turn at time but the jury imposed a much harsher penalty in the room, disqualification from race two. "The bow of Lazy Dog hit our port side just forward of the last stanchion which meant when they disconnected from us they took all the lifelines with them, including the bow rail," said crewman Daniel Turner of the incident. "It was quite a large impact as both boats were fully loaded. The Lightspeed shore crew worked in the scorching sun all afternoon and Sunday morning grinding carbon and getting the boat back together. The good thing about racing one design is there are usually parts available, so boats can keep racing." Lightspeed returned to the racetrack, The Sound area between North and South Head, on Sunday to complete three races under MHYC race officer Steve Tucker's direction. Their scores of 2, 4, 3, added to Saturday's 2 then average points for races two, three and four awarded by the protest committee, gave them the lowest score and the series win. The next time the MC38s meet will be on Sydney Harbour for the 2020 Australian Championship hosted by MHYC March 13-15. -- Lisa Ratcliff facebook.com/MC38Class/

  • 0 Luna Rossa Prada Pirelli dismasted during a sea trial

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    In Cagliari, on the 27 January 2020 during a sea trial, the AC75 Luna Rossa dismasted a few miles off the coast from Marina di Capitana. According to the team, no-one was injured in the incident. The mast, sails and rig were immediately recovered by the sailors onboard, with the help of the shore crew on the support ribs. “It’s a new boat and something like this can happen,” commented the Luna Rossa team. “If you don’t push hard you will never know your limits.” The whole team is already at work to return on the water as soon as possible and resume the training sessions in preparation for the America’s Cup World Series that will take place from April 23 to 26.  

  • 0 Australia set to defend SailGP Championship on Sydney Harbour.

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    The one month countdown is on until SailGP returns to Sydney Harbour on 28-29 February. Following a heart-pumping inaugural season, which saw Olympic hero Slingsby helm the Australia SailGP Team to victory over five other national teams to take home the trophy and historic US$1 million championship prize, the Australia team returns to defend its title in front of a home crowd. With the Sydney event set to kick off Season 2 of SailGP, Australians will be the first to witness the fruits of the league’s exciting off season expansion. Denmark and Spain join the nation versus nation global racing league, taking the total number of teams to seven with returnees Australia, France, Great Britain, Japan and the United States. Marking the one month countdown to Sydney SailGP, the Australia SailGP Team also announced that its championship-winning roster will remain unchanged for 2020, as some of Australian sports’ most celebrated athletes return for Season 2.   SailGP CEO Sir Russell Coutts said he was excited to see the competition return to Sydney next month, with the iconic harbor set to dazzle international audiences: “Sydney SailGP was a huge success in 2019, setting the bar for every other race that followed. With Australia defending the title in 2020 and two new teams in Denmark and Spain joining the competition, we’re expecting to see some great battles and a fantastic turn out.”

  • 0 ORC 2020 VPP and Rules now available

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    The VPP and the new 2020 version of the ORC Manager software has been distributed to the 35 Rating Offices that issue ORC International and ORC Club certificates around the world. This update will allow these offices to start issuing their new 2020 certificates according to their own needs and timelines, which for some is immediate: the first regatta of the year to use 2020 ratings is the Rolex Circuito Atlantico Sur 2020 in Argentina and Uruguay being held over 12-18 January, followed by the Ft Lauderdale - Key West Race one week later in Florida, USA. ORC racing in Spain is also active now. The Rolex Circuito Atlantico Sur 2020 is the first to use the 2020 ORC Rules and ratings with an inshore and offshore race format. The race to Key West will be the first of the year to use the new ORC Double Handed Certificate, specially developed to meet the demand for this growing trend in offshore racing. Double Handed certificates feature lower crew weights, a simple one-page layout, and a variety of simple scoring options available to race managers to better match the ratings with the course type. The 2020 ORC Rules are available now for viewing and download at www.orc.org/rules, along with a summary of the changes from 2019. Among these are the following: - boats with CDL - ORC Continental Championships must now include 2 offshore/coastal races that are not discardable in addition to the inshore races, matching the criteria for the Worlds - removal of Forward Accommodation and Jumper Stays effect on the VPP, removal of some obsolete measurements such as SPS, BAL, BWT, and CPW - improved aerodynamic treatment of Headsails set Flying with SHW/SFL <75%, with a gradual rating transition from "Code Zero" headsails to small asymmetric spinnakers up to a ratio SHW/SFL of 85%. - also improved are the VPP lift coefficients for various combinations of Headsails set Flying when listed in the sail inventory, and a requirement to list the measurements of all asymmetric spinnakers which have 75%< SHW/SFL < 85%, which are run one by one by VPP, not just the largest as it has been this far. - multiple non-overlapping headsails are now allowed to be tacked on the bowsprit, on the headstay and between the mast and the headstay without having to maintain the clew of the outside sail aft of the inner ones. The 2020 VPP has resulted in small changes - 85% of the fleet has +/- 0.5% GPH change and 96.5% is within +/- 1% - in rated speed for most of the >2000 boats in the ORCi test fleet, so CDL definitions of class divisions in the Continental and World Championships have also changed for 2020 to: Class A: 16.40 >= CDL > 11.59 Class B: 11.59 >= CDL > 9.77 Class C: 9.77 >= CDL > 8.56 The 2020 ORC European Championship in Capri will use not only CDL limits for the ORCi fleet, but will also feature an ORC DH Class in the Tres Golfi Race - photo courtesy Rolex Capri Sailing Week Among the many 1000's of boat types that receive ORCi or ORC Club certificates, ORC also offers standard certificates for boats from one-design classes that are in their class trim. This year the list of these classes has expanded to 45 one-designs eligible for these certificates. Access to the 2020 ORC VPP is also now available in the ORC's public portal to the rating system, ORC Sailor Services, where free certificate copies, test certificates, polar performance Speed Guides and Target Speed outputs are all available after obtaining a free login credential at www.orc.org/sailorservices. The 2020 ORC Super Yacht rule is also available now for over 100 sailing yachts >30 m in length that compete in races and regattas around the world. This delivery of the rule is in time for use at the first regatta on the ORCsy calendar: the 2020 Millennium Cup being held over 29 January - 1 February in Auckland, New Zealand. The designer's version of the ORCsy VPP software (DVP) is available for new users for €1200, and for current DVP subscribers at the price of €840. More information is on the ORC Superyacht software page at www.orc.org/index.asp?id=206. The ORC Multihull Rule project is still in progress, with a beta version of a VPP release expected in the coming months. Meanwhile the measurement platform for ORCmh has been completed, and several regattas are scheduled for scoring and analysis in the Winter and Spring season. More on ORC rating systems, ORC certificates and events can be found at www.orc.org.   

  • 0 TP52 Ichi Ban overall winner Sydney Hobart

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    Ichi Ban has been officially declared the overall winner of the Sydney to Hobart, the yacht's second handicap victory in three years. Skipper Matt Allen and the crew of the TP52 will on Monday be presented with the prestigious Tattersall Cup in the 75th edition of the race Ichi Ban, just completed her third Hobart. In 2017, the then very new Ichi Ban won it overall in her first outing, and now she has again this year, as well. It is a marvellous achievement for Matt Allen's IRC optimised Botin Partners 52, which was built by Spain's Longitud Cero. After a strong start out of Sydney, the 52-foot Ichi Ban beat some of the massive supermaxis to Bass Strait and handled the changeable winds better than their rivals. “The deciding moment was when we got through those weather systems. We got out of all those weather systems in good shape and ahead of the pack,” Allen said. Gweilo was second overall followed by Quest, which rose to third after Envy Scooters was hit with a time penalty for failing to properly give way to Quest near Sydney. By and large, Ichi Ban did lead their group the whole way. It is a bit like F1, where it is easier to win from in front. "We were in good shape the whole way, and in the TPs you might not be leading, but you do need to be in grasp of the top. Only then can you convert. Bouncing back at 52 feet is harder than if you're 65+. All of them are too close, if they go and you don't, then you're out the back door."   © Crosbie Lorimer Sail-world.com https://wwos.nine.com.au/news/ichi-ban-claims-overall-sydney-hobart-win/781de87a-f19b-47f6-9fca-9cc7fb3f5e78        

  • 0 Sir Peter Blake

    • News
    • by Team Racing-Yachts.com
    • 23-12-2019
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    Sir Peter BlakeIt's been 18 years since The Ocean Race legend, Sir Peter Blake passed away. Blake competed in a hat-trick of Races as skipper - finally achieving his dream of lifting The Ocean Race trophy at the fifth attempt, with Steinlager 2 in 1989-90. That win made history as the first New Zealand-flagged boat to win The Ocean Race, and the manner of victory left an indelible mark on the Race. Blake led Steinlager 2 to a clean sweep in the most dominant campaign in the Race's near-50 year history, winning every single one of the six legs - the first time that feat had been achieved since 1981-82, when the Race comprised four stages. The journey to victory had been a long one for Blake, who first competed in the Race as a 24-year-old crew onboard Burton Cutter in the 1973-74 edition. That experience proved the beginning of a 16-year obsession with the Race - he famously went on to describe the competition as something that 'gets in your blood... and you can't get rid of it' - and by the time the 1989-90 edition came around, Blake was ready to take a radical and risky step in search of victory. His idea for Steinlager 2 was to build the biggest and heaviest yacht in the Race, carrying 20 percent more sail area than its rivals. True to Blake's luck in the race up to that point, the initial yacht built had to be scrapped at the fitting-out stage after large areas of the high-tech carbon fibre-moulded hull were found to have delaminated. The delay cost two months of preparation, almost putting paid to Blake's campaign. But once the Race began, there was no stopping Blake and his crew on Steinlager 2 as they swept all before them, culminating in a legendary battle into their home port of Auckland, against fellow NZ boat, Fisher & Paykel, led by Grant Dalton. As the pair raced into the City of Sails, just a mile separated the boats, and a match race was underway. The battle that ensued was one of the most memorable in sailing history, as Blake got the better of his opponent to steal the honours in his hometown. www.theoceanrace.com   Sir Peter Blake was also a passionate and relentless champion for the environment, having spent his life on the ocean. Following his sailing career he turned his focus to helping protect the environment and raising awareness of the issues it faces, by voyaging to "environmental pulse points of the planet" and sharing what he discovered. He visited Antarctica to look at climate change, and then to the Amazon to look at the impacts of deforestation.  Tragically, Sir Peter was killed while carrying out this work. His death cut short his vision to allow millions of people around the world to care more about the environment and take action to protect it. The Sir Peter Blake Trust (BLAKE) was established in 2004 and is dedicated to continuing his environmental leadership legacy. We do this by inspiring environmental passion in people through life-changing adventures and programmes that follow in the footsteps of Sir Peter himself. https://blakenz.org/about-us